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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 673847, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/673847
Research Article

Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Szent István University, István utca 2, Budapest 1078, Hungary

Received 18 September 2014; Accepted 10 December 2014

Academic Editor: Tullia Maraldi

Copyright © 2015 Orsolya Farkas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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