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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 721514, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/721514
Review Article

Age-Related Cognitive Impairment as a Sign of Geriatric Neurocardiovascular Interactions: May Polyphenols Play a Protective Role?

Institute of Normal and Pathological Physiology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Sienkiewiczova 1, 813 71 Bratislava, Slovakia

Received 22 September 2014; Accepted 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Cristina Angeloni

Copyright © 2015 Fedor Jagla and Olga Pechanova. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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