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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 758678, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/758678
Review Article

Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen Sensing under Hypoxia

1Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China
2Joint Research Center for Bone and Joint Disease, Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China
3Department of Geriatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China

Received 30 November 2014; Accepted 22 January 2015

Academic Editor: Steven S. An

Copyright © 2015 Bo Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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