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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 964321, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/964321
Review Article

Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism

1Laboratory of Vision Science and Optometry, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań, Umultowska Street 85, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
2Nanobiomedical Center of Poznań, Umultowska Street 85, 61-614 Poznań, Poland
3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Chair of Cardiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Długa Street 1/2, 61-848 Poznań, Poland
4Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital-Research Institute, Outpatient Clinic, Rzgowska Street 281/289, Łódź, Poland

Received 20 March 2015; Revised 7 April 2015; Accepted 8 April 2015

Academic Editor: Claudio Cabello-Verrugio

Copyright © 2015 Krzysztof Piotr Michalak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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