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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2019643, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2019643
Clinical Study

Magnesium Supplementation Diminishes Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte DNA Oxidative Damage in Athletes and Sedentary Young Man

1Department of Physiology, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Pharmacy, 11121 Belgrade, Serbia
2Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Pharmacy, 11121 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 24 September 2015; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Paola Venditti

Copyright © 2016 Jelena Petrović et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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