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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 2398573, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2398573
Review Article

Endogenous Generation of Singlet Oxygen and Ozone in Human and Animal Tissues: Mechanisms, Biological Significance, and Influence of Dietary Components

Department of Food Science and Technology, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000, Nairobi 00200, Kenya

Received 27 December 2015; Accepted 8 February 2016

Academic Editor: Sergio Di Meo

Copyright © 2016 Arnold N. Onyango. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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