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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3269405, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3269405
Research Article

Proteomics-Based Identification of the Molecular Signatures of Liver Tissues from Aged Rats following Eight Weeks of Medium-Intensity Exercise

1School of Physical Education and Health, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing 526016, China
2Exercise Health and Technology Centre, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
3Laboratory of Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China

Received 4 June 2016; Revised 5 September 2016; Accepted 28 November 2016

Academic Editor: Ravirajsinh Jadeja

Copyright © 2016 Fanghui Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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