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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 3527579, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3527579
Review Article

Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), General Pathology Unit, Via S. Giacomo 14, 40126 Bologna, Italy

Received 25 September 2015; Accepted 1 November 2015

Academic Editor: Tanea T. Reed

Copyright © 2016 Maria Giulia Battelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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