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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 3907147, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3907147
Review Article

The Interplay of Reactive Oxygen Species, Hypoxia, Inflammation, and Sirtuins in Cancer Initiation and Progression

1Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
2Department of Cellular and Molecular Pathology, IRCCS San Raffaele, 00166 Rome, Italy
3Consortium MEBIC, San Raffaele University, 00166 Rome, Italy
4Department of Gynecological-Obstetrical Sciences and Urological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy
5Department of Human Anatomy, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy

Received 23 July 2015; Accepted 29 September 2015

Academic Editor: Sahdeo Prasad

Copyright © 2016 Marco Tafani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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