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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 3974648, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3974648
Research Article

Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

1Universidade Federal do Pará, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção no Hospital Universitário João de Barros Barreto, Belém, Brazil
2Instituto Evandro Chagas, Laboratório de Microscopia Eletrônica and Departamento de Arbovirologia e Febres Hemorrágicas Virais, Belém, Brazil

Received 4 August 2016; Revised 22 September 2016; Accepted 27 September 2016

Academic Editor: Michael D. Coleman

Copyright © 2016 Nara Lins et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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