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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4010357, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4010357
Review Article

Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

1Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2ICVS/3B’s-PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal
3Molecular and Environmental Biology Centre (CBMA), Department of Biology, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal

Received 24 April 2015; Revised 23 July 2015; Accepted 28 July 2015

Academic Editor: Eric E. Kelley

Copyright © 2016 Júlia Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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