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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4856431, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4856431
Research Article

Thioredoxin Binding Protein-2 Regulates Autophagy of Human Lens Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress via Inhibition of Akt Phosphorylation

1Eye Center, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
2Department of Otolaryngology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
3Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Received 23 May 2016; Accepted 3 August 2016

Academic Editor: Durga N. Tripathi

Copyright © 2016 Jiaojie Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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