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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5710403, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5710403
Research Article

The Cellular Response to Oxidatively Induced DNA Damage and Polymorphism of Some DNA Repair Genes Associated with Clinicopathological Features of Bladder Cancer

1Institute of Genetics and Cytology, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 27 Akademicheskaya Street, 220072 Minsk, Belarus
2N.N. Alexandrov National Cancer Centre of Belarus, Lesnoy, 223040 Minsk, Belarus

Received 18 May 2015; Revised 26 June 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: Amit Tyagi

Copyright © 2016 Nataliya V. Savina et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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