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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5845061, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5845061
Review Article

High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

1Center for Investigacións Científicas Avanzadas (CICA), Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Sciences Faculty, University of Coruña, 15071 A Coruña, Spain
2Translational Cancer Research Group, A Coruña Biomedical Research Institute (INIBIC), Carretera del Pasaje s/n, 15006 A Coruña, Spain

Received 2 June 2015; Accepted 27 July 2015

Academic Editor: Sahdeo Prasad

Copyright © 2016 Aida Barreiro-Alonso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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