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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1038153, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1038153
Research Article

Antioxidant, Cytotoxic, and Toxic Activities of Propolis from Two Native Bees in Brazil: Scaptotrigona depilis and Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides

1School of Environmental and Biological Science, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados, MS, Brazil
2Course of Chemistry, State University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Dourados, MS, Brazil
3Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Interdisciplinary Center of Biochemistry Investigation, University of Mogi das Cruzes, Mogi das Cruzes, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Edson Lucas dos Santos; moc.liamg@dhpsotnasnosde

Received 10 November 2016; Revised 27 January 2017; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 9 March 2017

Academic Editor: Jasminka Giacometti

Copyright © 2017 Thaliny Bonamigo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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