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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1891849, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1891849
Research Article

Carlina vulgaris L. as a Source of Phytochemicals with Antioxidant Activity

1Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2Department of Pharmacognosy, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Marie Curie-Skłodowska 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
3Department of Vascular Surgery, Medical University of Lublin, Staszica 11, 20-081 Lublin, Poland
4Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of Biology and Biochemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Akademicka 19, 20-033 Lublin, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Maciej Strzemski and Sławomir Dresler

Received 8 June 2017; Revised 17 August 2017; Accepted 6 September 2017; Published 18 October 2017

Academic Editor: Jie Li

Copyright © 2017 Maciej Strzemski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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