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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2740364, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2740364
Review Article

Antiobesity Effects of Anthocyanins in Preclinical and Clinical Studies

1Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Research Center for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
2Department of Biotechnology, University of Rijeka, Radmile Matejčić 2, HR-51000 Rijeka, Croatia
3Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, 83100 Avellino, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Elena Azzini; ti.vog.aerc@inizza.anele

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 23 May 2017; Accepted 13 June 2017; Published 13 July 2017

Academic Editor: Silvana Hrelia

Copyright © 2017 Elena Azzini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The natural phytochemicals present in foods, including anthocyanins, might play a role in attenuating obesity by producing a decrease in weight and adipose tissue. This review focused on current knowledge about anthocyanins’ role in obesity and its related comorbidities reported in animal models and humans. We summarized their target identification and mechanism of action through several pathways and their final effects on health and well-being. Into consideration of ongoing researches, we highlighted the following key points: a healthy relationship between anthocyanin supplementation and antiobesity effects suffers of the same pros and cons evidenced when the beneficial responses to other phytochemical treatments towards different degenerative diseases have been considered; the different dosage applied in animal versus clinical studies; the complex metabolism and biotransformation to which anthocyanins and phytochemicals are subjected in the intestine and tissues; the possibility that different components present in the supplemented mixtures can interact generating antagonistic, synergistic, or additive effects difficult to predict, and the difference between prevention and therapy. The evolution of the field must seriously consider the need to establish new and adequate cellular and animal models which may, in turn, allow the design of more efficient and prevention-targeted clinical studies.