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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3079148, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3079148
Research Article

EGCG Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Changes in Gut Microbiota, Decreases of DNA Strand Breaks, and Changes in Expression and DNA Methylation of Dnmt1 and MLH1 in C57BL/6J Male Mice

1Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
2Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Correspondence should be addressed to Alexander G. Haslberger; ta.ca.eivinu@regreblsah.rednaxela

Received 27 July 2016; Revised 12 October 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016; Published 4 January 2017

Academic Editor: Thea Magrone

Copyright © 2017 Marlene Remely et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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