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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3103272, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3103272
Research Article

A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal®) Provides Neuroprotection from Diverse Oxidative Stress-Inducing Agents In Vitro by Preserving Cellular Glutathione

1Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, 2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208, USA
2Knoebel Institute for Healthy Aging, University of Denver, 2155 E. Wesley Ave., Denver, CO 80208, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Daniel A. Linseman

Received 15 February 2017; Accepted 13 July 2017; Published 15 August 2017

Academic Editor: Tommaso Cassano

Copyright © 2017 Aimee N. Winter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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