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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3292087, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3292087
Review Article

Disrupted Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dynamics, Mitophagy, and Biogenesis during Cancer Cachexia: A Role for Inflammation

Integrative Muscle Biology Laboratory, Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to James A. Carson; ude.cs.xobliam@jnosrac

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 6 June 2017; Accepted 19 June 2017; Published 13 July 2017

Academic Editor: Moh H. Malek

Copyright © 2017 Brandon N. VanderVeen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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