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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4157213, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4157213
Research Article

Role of Protein Kinase C and Nox2-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Formation in the Activation and Maturation of Dendritic Cells by Phorbol Ester and Lipopolysaccharide

1Department of Dermatology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany
2Center for Cardiology/Cardiology 1, Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany
3Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis (CTH), Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Angelika Reske-Kunz; ed.zniam-inu@znuk-ekser.a and Andreas Daiber; ed.zniam-inu@rebiad

Received 18 November 2016; Revised 7 February 2017; Accepted 8 February 2017; Published 28 March 2017

Academic Editor: Leopoldo Aguilera-Aguirre

Copyright © 2017 Judith Stein et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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