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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4504925, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4504925
Research Article

Age and Environment Influences on Mouse Prion Disease Progression: Behavioral Changes and Morphometry and Stereology of Hippocampal Astrocytes

1Laboratório de Investigações em Neurodegeneração e Infecção, Hospital Universitário, João de Barros Barreto, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil
2Universidade do Estado do Pará, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Belém, PA, Brazil
3Vertebrate Embryology Laboratory, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
4Lab of Experimental Neuropathology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
5Departamento de Arbovirologia e Febres Hemorrágicas, Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, PA, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Cristovam Wanderley Picanço Diniz; moc.liamg@zinidpwc

Received 27 July 2016; Revised 21 October 2016; Accepted 24 November 2016; Published 24 January 2017

Academic Editor: Rui D. Prediger

Copyright © 2017 J. Bento-Torres et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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