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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 6019796, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6019796
Research Article

Effects of Aging and Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Supplementation on Brain Arginine Metabolism in Rats

1Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh Campus, Sungai Buloh, Malaysia
2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
4School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Correspondence should be addressed to Hanafi Ahmad Damanhuri; ym.ude.mku.mkupp@iruhnamad.ifanah

Received 21 July 2017; Revised 4 October 2017; Accepted 9 October 2017; Published 19 November 2017

Academic Editor: Anna M. Giudetti

Copyright © 2017 Musalmah Mazlan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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