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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7921363, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7921363
Research Article

High-Intensity Exercise Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Hypertrophy but Does Not Restore the Nitroso-Redox Imbalance in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

1Department of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad de Talca, Talca, Chile
2Institute for Chemistry of Natural Resources, Universidad de Talca, Talca, Chile
3Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad de Talca, Talca, Chile

Correspondence should be addressed to Daniel R. Gonzalez; lc.aclatu@zelaznogad

Received 10 February 2017; Revised 18 April 2017; Accepted 27 April 2017; Published 18 June 2017

Academic Editor: Patricia C. Brum

Copyright © 2017 Ulises Novoa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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