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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9028435, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9028435
Review Article

Mitophagy Transcriptome: Mechanistic Insights into Polyphenol-Mediated Mitophagy

School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Correspondence should be addressed to Esther Wong; gs.ude.utn@gnowrehtse

Received 19 March 2017; Accepted 26 April 2017; Published 25 May 2017

Academic Editor: Moh H. Malek

Copyright © 2017 Sijie Tan and Esther Wong. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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