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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 1873962, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1873962
Review Article

Antioxidant and Cell-Signaling Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Central Nervous System

1Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea
2Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Applied Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104, Republic of Korea
3Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, 32 Daesingongwon-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49201, Republic of Korea
4East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea
5Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Junyang Jung; rk.ca.uhk@gnujj

Received 28 August 2017; Revised 13 November 2017; Accepted 11 December 2017; Published 4 February 2018

Academic Editor: Sebastien Talbot

Copyright © 2018 Ulfuara Shefa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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