Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 2468457, 23 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2468457
Review Article

Insights on Localized and Systemic Delivery of Redox-Based Therapeutics

1Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
4Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
5Department of Cell Biology & Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Edward S. M. Bahnson; ude.cnu.dem@nosnhab_drawde

Received 30 October 2017; Accepted 18 December 2017; Published 14 February 2018

Academic Editor: Maria C. Franco

Copyright © 2018 Nicholas E. Buglak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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