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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018, Article ID 7912765, 21 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7912765
Research Article

Computational Studies Applied to Flavonoids against Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases

1Postgraduate Program in Natural and Synthetic Bioactive Products, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil
2In Silico Research Laboratory, Eminent Bioscience, Inodre - 452010, Madhya Pradesh, India
3Bioinformatics Research Laboratory, LeGene Biosciences, Indore - 452010, Madhya Pradesh, India
4Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon
5Laboratory of Synthesis and Drug Delivery, Department of Biological Science, State University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil
6Teaching and Research Management-University Hospital, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Luciana Scotti; moc.liamg@ittocs.anaicul

Received 5 October 2018; Revised 12 November 2018; Accepted 14 November 2018; Published 30 December 2018

Academic Editor: Alin Ciobica

Copyright © 2018 Alex France M. Monteiro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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