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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 8561892, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8561892
Research Article

p66Shc Inactivation Modifies RNS Production, Regulates Sirt3 Activity, and Improves Mitochondrial Homeostasis, Delaying the Aging Process in Mouse Brain

1Laboratory of Oxygen Metabolism, INIGEM-UBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Departamento de Medicina, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
3Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Correspondence should be addressed to María Cecilia Carreras; ra.abu.byff@sarerrac

Received 24 October 2017; Accepted 17 January 2018; Published 12 March 2018

Academic Editor: Tim Hofer

Copyright © 2018 Hernán Pérez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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