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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2019, Article ID 2860642, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2860642
Research Article

Phosphatidylcholine Extends Lifespan via DAF-16 and Reduces Amyloid-Beta-Induced Toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

Department of Medical Biotechnology, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Sang-Kyu Park; rk.ca.hcs@krapks

Received 28 February 2019; Revised 16 May 2019; Accepted 27 May 2019; Published 11 July 2019

Guest Editor: Myon-Hee Lee

Copyright © 2019 So-Hyeon Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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