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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 124165, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/124165
Review Article

VMAT2-Deficient Mice Display Nigral and Extranigral Pathology and Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

1Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2Center for Neurodegenerative Disease, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
3Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QX, UK
4Department of Neurology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
5Department of Pharmacology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 27 October 2010; Accepted 3 January 2011

Academic Editor: Huaibin Cai

Copyright © 2011 Tonya N. Taylor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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