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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 767230, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/767230
Review Article

Mitochondrial Fusion/Fission, Transport and Autophagy in Parkinson's Disease: When Mitochondria Get Nasty

1Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Largo Marquês de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal
2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Largo Marquês de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal

Received 1 October 2010; Revised 26 November 2010; Accepted 5 January 2011

Academic Editor: Charleen T. Chu

Copyright © 2011 Daniela M. Arduíno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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