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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 951709, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/951709
Review Article

Toxin-Induced and Genetic Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

Department of Neurology, Sapporo Medical University, South1, West17, chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556, Japan

Received 13 October 2010; Accepted 31 October 2010

Academic Editor: Yuzuru Imai

Copyright © 2011 Shin Hisahara and Shun Shimohama. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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