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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2016, Article ID 9531917, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9531917
Research Article

Protection against Mitochondrial and Metal Toxicity Depends on Functional Lipid Binding Sites in ATP13A2

1Laboratory of Cellular Transport Systems, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, KU Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg O&N 1, Herestraat 49, P.O. Box 802, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Laboratory of Cell Death Research and Therapy, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, KU Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg O&N 1, Herestraat 49, P.O. Box 802, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
3Research Group for Neurobiology and Gene Therapy, Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 33, Blok i, P.O. Box 7001, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
4Leuven Viral Vector Core, KU Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 33, Blok i, P.O. Box 7001, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 29 December 2015; Accepted 23 February 2016

Academic Editor: José M. Fuentes

Copyright © 2016 Shaun Martin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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