Pain Research and Treatment

Pain Research and Treatment / 2017 / Article

Corrigendum | Open Access

Volume 2017 |Article ID 1535473 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1535473

Andrew D. Vigotsky, Ryan P. Bruhns, "Corrigendum to “The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review”", Pain Research and Treatment, vol. 2017, Article ID 1535473, 4 pages, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1535473

Corrigendum to “The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review”

Received21 Aug 2017
Accepted27 Sep 2017
Published26 Oct 2017

In the article titled “The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review” [1], there was an error in the interpretation of the data presented by Plaza-Manzano et al. (2014). Therefore, in the Spinal Manipulation section, the sentence “Both cervical and thoracic groups saw decreases in neurotensin and oxytocin, as well as increases in orexin A plasma concentrations following respective interventions” should be corrected to “Both cervical and thoracic groups saw increases in neurotensin and oxytocin, as well as decreases in orexin A plasma concentrations following respective interventions.”

Additionally, in the Conclusion section, the text reading “Nearly all types of manual therapy have been shown to elicit a neurophysiological response that is associated with the descending pain modulation circuit; however, it appears that different types of manual therapy work through different mechanisms (Table ). For example, while massage therapy appears to elicit an oxytocin response, spinal manipulation does not. It is crucial that more higher quality research be performed to better understand these mechanisms, as it can lead to a better understanding of how each therapy can be applied to drive more specific clinical research” should be corrected as follows.

“Nearly all types of manual therapy have been shown to elicit a neurophysiological response that is associated with the descending pain modulation circuit; however, it appears that potential analgesic responses to different types of manual therapy may be modulated by different mechanisms (Table ). For example, while osteopathic manipulative therapy appears to elicit a β-endorphin response, conventional massage does not. It is crucial that higher quality research with better controls be carried out to better understand potential mechanisms, as this will lead to a better understanding of how each therapy may be applied to drive more specific clinical research.”

Finally, Table should be corrected as follows.


StudySubjectsControl/shamVariationFindings

Degenhardt et al. 7 women and 3 men with () and without () low back painLight-touchOMTβ-endorphins
↑ PEA

McPartland et al. Osteopathic patient population ()Sham manipulationOMT↑ AEA

Vernon et al. 27 healthy males(1) Control group laid supine on a treatment table
(2) Sham group received joint play maneuvers
SMTβ-endorphins

Christian et al. 40 male subjects who were chiropractic patients and students with and without painSham (joint taken to end-range of motion)SMTβ-endorphins

Sanders et al. 9 males and 9 females with acute (<2 weeks) low back painSham group () received light touch at L4/L5–S1SMTβ-endorphins

Plaza-Manzano et al. 30 graduate school studentsNo treatmentSMTorexin A
neurotensin
oxytocin

Skyba et al. 113 male Sprague-Dawley rats(1) Vehicle w/manipulation
(2) Vehicle w/anesthesia
(3) Drugs w/anesthesia
Knee manipulationSerotonin-mediated
Norepinephrine-mediated
Non-GABA-mediated

Martins et al. 8 male Swiss mice per group(1) Control
(2) Sham
Ankle joint mobilizationEO-

Martins et al. 8 male Swiss mice per group(1) Control
(2) Sham
Ankle joint mobilizationCBR-

Martins et al. 8 male Swiss mice per group(1) Control
(2) Sham
Ankle joint mobilizationAdenosine-

Martins et al. 8 adult male Wistar rats per group(1) Sham
(2) Sham w/anesthesia
(3) Sham w/mobilization
(4) Crush
(5) Crush w/anesthesia
Ankle joint mobilization↓ glial cell activation

Paungmali et al. 7 female and 17 males with lateral epicondylalgia(1) Placebo
(2) Control
MWMNo increase in tolerance over treatment period

Paungmali et al. 4 female and 14 males with lateral epicondylalgia(1) Placebo
(2) Control
MWMNon-EO-

Santos et al. Male Wistar rats(1) Control
(2) Injury only
(3) Sham
(4) Sham w/mobilization
NMDynorphin-mediated

Kaada  and  Torsteinbø6 male and 6 female subjects with a history of myalgiaConnective tissue massageβ-endorphins

Trentini et al. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats(1) Control
(2) Placebo
AcupressureEO-

Fassoulaki et al. 4 females and 8 males without a familiarity with acupuncture(1) Control
(2) Sham
Acupressureβ-endorphins

Day et al. 17 women and 14 men who were healthy and free of painControlConventional massageβ-endorphins
β-lipotropins

Agren et al. 13–21 Male Sprague-Dawley ratsControlConventional MassageOxytocin-

Turner et al. 26 nulliparous women that cycle(1) Positive emotion
(2) Negative emotion
Conventional massage↑ oxytocin

Bello et al. 14 malesControlConventional massage↑ oxytocin
→ arginine vasopressin

Morhenn et al. 50 females and 45 malesRestConventional massage↑ oxytocin
β-endorphins

Hernandez-Reif et al. 13 women and 11 men with >6 months low back painRelaxation therapyConventional massage↑ dopamine
↑ serotonin

Hernandez-Reif et al. 34 women with stage 1 or 2 breast cancerControl (medical treatment-only)Conventional massage↑ dopamine
↑ serotonin

Field et al. ReviewConventional massage↑ dopamine
↑ serotonin

Hart et al. Nineteen women with anorexia nervosaControl (standard treatment-only)Conventional massage↑ dopamine

Lund et al. 19 fibromyalgia patientsGuided relaxationConventional massage↑ corticotropin releasing factor

Billhult et al. 32 women with breast cancerAttentionConventional massage↑ oxytocin

Tsuji et al. 7 Japanese boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their mothersControl (no massage, crossover)Conventional massage↑ oxytocin

Rapaport et al. 29 females and 24 malesLight touchConventional massage→ oxytocin
↓ arginine vasopressin

Rapaport et al. 23 females and 22 malesLight touchConventional massage↑ oxytocin (acute)
→ oxytocin (chronic)

denotes review; denotes a conclusion inferred from naloxone or relevant antagonistic response.

References

  1. A. D. Vigotsky and R. P. Bruhns, “The role of descending modulation in manual therapy and its analgesic implications: a narrative review,” Pain Research & Management, vol. 2015, Article ID 292805, 11 pages, 2015. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar

Copyright © 2017 Andrew D. Vigotsky and Ryan P. Bruhns. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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