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Volume 2011, Article ID 419793, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/419793
Research Article

Experimental Wing Damage Affects Foraging Effort and Foraging Distance in Honeybees Apis mellifera

1School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK
2School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
3Department of Pomology and Apiculture, University of Agriculture in Krakow, 29 Listopada 54, 31-425 Krakow, Poland
4Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Merida, Yucatan 97100, Mexico
5Department of Biology and Environmental Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK

Received 23 February 2011; Accepted 19 April 2011

Academic Editor: Felipe Andrés León Contrera

Copyright © 2011 Andrew D. Higginson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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