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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 607161, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/607161
Research Article

Human Amniotic Fluid Cells Form Functional Gap Junctions with Cortical Cells

1Neurogenesis and Brain Repair Group, Neurobiology Program, Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6
2Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5

Received 2 March 2012; Accepted 17 April 2012

Academic Editor: Markus Hengstschläger

Copyright © 2012 Anna Jezierski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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