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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 658356, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/658356
Research Article

Comprehensive Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Placenta and Fetal Membrane and Their Response to Osteoactivin Stimulation

1Stem Cell and Microenvironment Laboratory, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation, Doha 24144, Qatar
2Departments of Genetic Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA
3Maternal and Fetal Unit, Women Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha 3050, Qatar
4Genomic Core, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation, Doha 24144, Qatar
5Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Orthopaedic Surgery and Sport Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
6Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha 24144, Qatar

Received 9 January 2012; Revised 12 March 2012; Accepted 30 March 2012

Academic Editor: Toshio Nikaido

Copyright © 2012 C. M. Raynaud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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