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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 920581, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/920581
Research Article

Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cell Expansion by Plating Whole Bone Marrow at a Low Cellular Density: A More Advantageous Method for Clinical Use

1Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Unit, Pediatric Onco-Hematology Department, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, 10126 Turin, Italy
2Department of Pediatrics, University of Turin, Piazza Polonia 94, 10126 Turin, Italy
3Molecular Biotechnology Center, University of Turin, P.za Polonia 94, 10126 Turin, Italy

Received 13 May 2011; Accepted 1 August 2011

Academic Editor: Peter Schlenke

Copyright © 2012 Katia Mareschi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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