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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 895714, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/895714
Review Article

Bottlenecks in the Efficient Use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products Based on Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

1Department of Stem Cells, Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER), 41092 Seville, Spain
2Newbiotechnic (NBT), Bollullos de la Mitación, 41110 Seville, Spain
3CIBER de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), 08036 Barcelona, Spain

Received 24 July 2014; Accepted 5 March 2015

Academic Editor: Claudia Montero-Menei

Copyright © 2015 Natalia Escacena et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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