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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1797692, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1797692
Review Article

Long Noncoding RNA Regulation of Pluripotency

1Department of Biology and Biotechnology Charles Darwin, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Institute Pasteur Fondazione Cenci-Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy

Received 4 March 2015; Accepted 7 July 2015

Academic Editor: Aster H. Juan

Copyright © 2016 Alessandro Rosa and Monica Ballarino. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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