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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3753581, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3753581
Review Article

Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

1Division of Molecular Signaling and Biochemistry, Department of Health Improvement, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580, Japan
2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, 38 Morohongo, Moroyama-machi, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495, Japan
3Division of Biomedical Science, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Marian University, 3200 Cold Spring Road, Indianapolis, IN 46222, USA

Received 18 March 2016; Accepted 5 May 2016

Academic Editor: Coralie Sengenès

Copyright © 2016 Shoichiro Kokabu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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