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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4126214, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4126214
Review Article

The Progress of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Models of Parkinson’s Disease

Ji-feng Kang,1 Bei-sha Tang,1,2,3,4 and Ji-feng Guo1,2,3,4

1Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
2State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
3Key Laboratory of Hunan Province in Neurodegenerative Disorders, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
4Neurodegenerative Disorders Research Center, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China

Received 19 August 2015; Accepted 29 October 2015

Academic Editor: Yujing Li

Copyright © 2016 Ji-feng Kang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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