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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5184601, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5184601
Research Article

Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Decidua Basalis of Human Term Placenta

1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Mail Code 1515, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden
3Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden
4King Abdulaziz Medical City, Department of Pathology, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
5King Abdulaziz Medical City, Division of Cardiac Surgery, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
6National Center for Stem Cell Technology, Life Sciences and Environment Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442, Saudi Arabia
7College of Science and Health Professions, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Mail Code 3124, P.O. Box 3660, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia
8Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne and Department of Perinatal Medicine Pregnancy Research Centre, Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 5 November 2015; Revised 14 December 2015; Accepted 5 January 2016

Academic Editor: Albert Rizvanov

Copyright © 2016 F. M. Abomaray et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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