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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5395261, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5395261
Research Article

Comparison of Signaling Pathways Gene Expression in CD34 Umbilical Cord Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cells

1School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Chair of Woman’s Health, Medical University of Silesia, Ulicy Medyków 12, 40-752 Katowice, Poland
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Boni Fratres Catoviensis Hospital, Ulica Księdza Leopolda Markiefki 87, 40-211 Katowice, Poland

Received 12 July 2015; Revised 30 August 2015; Accepted 16 September 2015

Academic Editor: Maria A. Rueger

Copyright © 2016 Rafał Stojko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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