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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5736059, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5736059
Review Article

Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

1Laboratorio de Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Monseñor Alvaro del Portillo 12455, Las Condes, 7550000 Santiago, Chile
2Center for Interdisciplinary Studies on the Nervous System (CISNe), Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile
3Program for Cell Biology and Microscopy, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile
4Instituto de Anatomía, Histología y Patología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile

Received 12 February 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Yanfang Chen

Copyright © 2016 Alejandro Luarte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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