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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6289825, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6289825
Review Article

Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Polytrauma: Actor and Target

1Department of Orthopaedic Trauma, Hand, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital of Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2Department of Anaesthesiology, Military Hospital Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
3Orthopedic Department, Division for Biochemistry of Joint and Connective Tissue Diseases, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany

Received 11 March 2016; Accepted 9 May 2016

Academic Editor: Jonathan W. Lowery

Copyright © 2016 Markus Huber-Lang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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