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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6484713, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6484713
Review Article

The Application of Human iPSCs in Neurological Diseases: From Bench to Bedside

Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China

Received 5 September 2015; Revised 23 November 2015; Accepted 26 November 2015

Academic Editor: Luciano Vellon

Copyright © 2016 Nina Xie and Beisha Tang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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