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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7828049, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7828049
Review Article

Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Current Challenges and Future Concerns

1Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
2Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
3State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China

Received 11 September 2015; Revised 10 December 2015; Accepted 20 April 2016

Academic Editor: Luciano Vellon

Copyright © 2016 Weiwei Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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