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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8291260, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8291260
Review Article

Neural Conversion and Patterning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Developmental Perspective

1Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
2Center for Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, Eberhard-Karls-University, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
3National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, UCL Institute of Neurology, 33 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
4Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
5Euan MacDonald Centre for MND, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK

Received 30 October 2015; Accepted 24 January 2016

Academic Editor: Jason Weick

Copyright © 2016 Alexandra Zirra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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